Dad G

Despite having such a great father, I sometimes still feel like a terrible son. I take on too many things at once, I am disorganized, I struggle with prioritizing tasks, am often pre-occupied, and frequently forgetful. All of these things were not taught to me by my dad, but somehow worked their way into my life-skillset anyway.

I’d like to blame him here, but know that none of this was modeled for me in the home. What I am happy to share are the amazing things that I did learn from this man whixh have contributed so much in making me the man, husband, father, and teacher I am today.

Did I mention easily distracted?

Sound funny? In its own way, yes and no. Right now though, is time to celebrate my pops. It’s Father’s Day, and instead of sending a card without ever enough money or gift card value to show my appreciation, I wanted to share something digitally with the world that would honour my dad Bill, and the blessings that he has given my life instead.

Wisdom

It is no lie that from the moment a child joins Team Earth, there is much to learn. My dad stepped into the role of Co-CIO(Chief Information Officer) in my life. Come to think of it, there were a lot of roles that he took on once family life started: Co-CFO, Co-Jurist, Co-Cop, Co-Logistics Manager, and Co-protector to name five.

From the get-go he was providing information and feedback. Somedays it was like come here, be quiet, get off of that, stop hurting your sister, stop bothering your brother, go to sleep, stay out of the forest, and so much more. Dad taught me what it was like to be a peacekeeper and how to maintain law and order.

As I grew a little older, it became more technical, iterative, and descriptive. By the time I was 5 much knowledge was gained. Always be learning, work hard, play hard, be honest, do your chores, quit hitting your brother and sister, don’t interrupt, pay attention to your surroundings, be respectful to others, be a problem solver, and learn new words everyday by reading. And then it was time to go to school.

School 

To a kindergarten kid, school is a giant indoor and outdoor playground. There were things to discover, games to play, songs to sing, and people too. At the end of the day, Dad would ask us what we had learnt and I am sure that the answer was always the same one, “Nothing”. Most days, I wanted to go to school and I wanted to show how much I was learning. There was so much to do, experience, and try even when we learnt “nothing”, we still managed to learn something.

My dad shared, that when he was growing up, he liked school too. He preferred playing sports, but also enjoyed his academic subjects. For him, the end of Grade 12 meant hitting the job market. You could get a job with a high school diploma in those days. I remember that he spoke about the importance of going to college/university and how a degree would be a benefit in our lives. Hard work mattered if any of us wanted to get ahead in this world. That meant I had to get a part-time job. 

Work 

Newspaper routes, washing dishes, bussing tables, and waiter were all lines on my resumé before turning 18. As Co-CFO, finances were important to my dad too. ‘Money did not grow on trees”, clichés about money did. Yet, despite having to get up early on weekends to go to work, the satisfaction of earning my own money for a job well done has never gone away. My first official paycheck at age 14 was a big event. It also signified the end of my allowance, but the beginning of my ability to generate income and start making some financial decisions for myself.

In many ways work was like freedom. It allowed me to do the things I’d never done before. The people skills and financial literacy are still in use. My parents’ hard work allowed us to have a wonderful home and security. This privilege also came with some responsibilities and expectations (a fair deal, although difficult to admit at the time).

Working was, is, and will be what we do. Even now, at 85 years old, dad is working full time, and probably loving every minute of it. I am still many years away from that milestone, but have already begun strategizing on what my 70s and 80s will hold beyond teacher life. Law school? Advertising? Barista? All threesta?

A strong work ethic shared by my dad has served me well as an entrepreneur and as an educator. Throughout all of my iterations as a child, adolescent, young adult, spouse, parent, and educator, my father’s ability to guide me towards make good decisions without deriding my choices has helped me in and out of the classroom. What still surprises me to this day is that even when I deserved to have my figurative ass kicked with an “I told you so.” or a “You should have…”, he allowed me to make my mistakes knowing that I would learn from them. That is how I try to do it too.

Here are a few of my dad’s pearls of wisdom (original and otherwise) that I am passing on to my son. Afterall, there will always more to parenting than just passing on DNA. Perhaps DNA stands for something else too.

Dad’s Natural Advice aka DNA 

“There’s no substitute for hard work.”
“If you have time to do it wrong, you’d better have time to do it over.”
“You can’t be a leader without a following.”
“You can fool some people some times, but you can’t fool all the people all the time.”
“Do nice things that help others.”
“Pay attention to the world around you. Take time to notice the little things.”
“Be kind to others without expecting anything in return.”
“A good vocabulary is the key to higher learning.”
and my all time favourite…
“Take French, you might get a job someday.”
Yay for second language learning!

I have shared each of these gems with my son and students over the years. Not a single one appears in a curriculum document, except perhaps the learn French one(only until Gr 9). Nevertheless, the wisdom at the core of each one is also at the heart of our collective humanity and capacity to learn and grow. My dad knows this, and continues to share it with a grace and wisdom beyond any of the degrees found conferred in academia.

It is with the knowledge that I pick up the mantle he has hewed before me, carry it forward, and prepare the future to hold it high.

Thanks Dad for the lessons. I still need more. May God continue to bless you with health, happiness, and wisdom for years and years to come so you can keep on kicking proverbial ass with wisdom. 

Love Will

 

Who knew that thinking we were not good at Math ≠ the Truth?

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photo by Sam Howzit CC BY 2.0

Well in advance of my ever becoming an educator came an episode of BBC’s Dr. Who, where the TARDIS traveller shared,

“You know the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common: They don’t alter their views to fit the facts; they alter the facts to fit their views, which can be uncomfortable if you happen to be one of the facts that needs altering.” from Dr Who Episode – The Face of Evil Part 4 January 22, 1977

It seems very clear now, that we are capable of convincing ourselves of anything regardless of sensibility, social standing, or support system. It’s happening everyday in classrooms because it has been allowed to happen over and over this way since forever. I’ll use the short story below to illustrate how it might be playing out in a typical Math classroom.

Some others

It’s a Tuesday, or is it Wednesday? No matter, because it’s Mathday. A teacher shares the concept(s). Some respond with nods, others avoid eye-contact, and silent supplications of “please don’t ask me to explain this”. Students try to understand what’s being taught. Some get it faster than others. Seconds pass, then minutes. Teacher grows impatient with awkward silences and then ploughs on. As if in unison, the others begin to doubt whether they’ll ever get it? Some wonder in disbelief how the others don’t get it and repeat. At some point most educators will have learners floating in various states between being some or the others.

Suddenly, but with far less warning, an assessment is given and the results serve to separate some from the others. Followed by a false, yet difficult to overcome, opinion that Math ‘can’t be got’, and therefore  must be hated, simply because of the inability of others to solve all or some of the concepts taught and problems given. This imbalanced view negatively warps some mindsets one way or an other;

  1. They tie Math and other academic success to self-worth
  2. Students begin to doubt their abilities based on single results rather than embracing an attitude of process and progress instead of performance.
  3. Problem solving skills are mitigated out of the day by educators who feel they have to cover what’s in the text books rather than what’s needed by their students. In other words they are being taught to the test rather than being allow to test what they’re taught.
  4. Resilience is skill that goes further underdeveloped in favour of focusing on report card marks. Instead of emphasising growth from concept attainment, iterative thinking, and real life application opportunities students are made to live, breathe, and be measured by a singular method and measure.

Simply put, we can’t allow alternative facts, false beliefs, or misinformation to infect the minds of our learners and colleagues. Yes, teachers believe that they can’t do Math too. We need to stand in the gap to prevent and dispel destructive mindsets. For some students and teachers this means time to unlearn, a safe place to make mistakes, relearn, and start again.

If we equip our learners with the ability to re-frame their focus with confidence and arm them with problem solving tools we can erase the discourse of doubt that plagues so many. This will run counter to the mass instruction of the past, but it will be better than perpetuating the destruction any longer. We need to understand that we are works in process and success will look different from lesson to lesson and learner to learner.

Perhaps then, the breezy breath of fresh air will be felt as a change for the better by everyone? In the meantime, I will be moving the air about my classroom like a human tornado helping students understand that thinking they are not good at Math is does not equal the truth.

I hope you liked this post. If you did, please consider subscribing. If you didn’t please consider subscribing to keep an eye on me or offer me some constructive feedback. I’d appreciate it and look forward to the learning.

3 things

Warning: Do not read this post for more than 3 -4 minutes.

2016 is hurtling towards its calendar end and thoughts turn to a highlight reel retrospective heading for the history books. My mind is counting down around a repeating loop of ideas and reflections like a Space X reusable rocket. Well, maybe the baking soda and vinegar in a bottle type.

As the countdown approaches, I wanted to ask educators around the world to answer this question. If you’d like, think of it as a wishlist.

What would you change in education for 2017?

If you could change 3 things about education in 2017, knowing you wouldn’t fail, what would they be? I’m talking Astro Teller moon shot type changes here.

We use the word “moonshots” to remind us to keep our visions big — to keep dreaming. And we use the word “factory” to remind ourselves that we want to have concrete visions — concrete plans to make them real.  Astro Teller

Here are my 3 cannot-miss-the-spot-moonshot-thoughts.

  1. End the school to prison pipeline. My wish would be that schools could be funded with the same amount of money per student as the prisoners of our world. I believe that if we provided more funding for our schools, then our prisons would soon be very different and under-crowded spaces.I also believe that by stopping the flow of students from classrooms to courtrooms to cell blocks there would be a better standard of living for our entire society with opportunity for all. Imagine what could be done with all of the extra money if it was spent educating instead of incarcerating? Did you know that the students receive on average only 1/3 of the funding of prisoners?
  2. End standardized testing. What good is asking students to cram 10 months of learning into 9 months, only to stresst them out?  Why are millions of tax dollars being spent on tying up instructional time and resources in order to administer and assess students in grades 3, 6, 9, and 10. Is it worth quantifying education annually as a soapbox for politicians?Has anyone thought that the questions being asked are not considerate of skills and understandings required for the future? Cynical me asks, if there is a correlation to test results and real estate value? This appears to frequently be the case in my own province of Ontario, Canada. My own home price benefiting from strong results in neighbourhood schools.When I look at results by district in the U.S and compare facilities and funding I am left with many questions around equity and distribution of assets. In 2012, 1.7 billion dollars were spent on standardized testing in the U.S.A. If the financial cost doesn’t get your attention, how about the anxiety and mental health issues that result from many educators who feel they need to teach to the test instead of to the needs of their learners?
  3. End the global desk-wagging contest known as PISA and invest the money shelled out back into the students. Are you noticing a trend yet? To whose benefit do these tests and rankings really serve? How come the sample sizes are so small? Why are students and schools used as collateral/capital for international bragging rights? Did you know that schools can be recruited or selected to participate? How does this not scream of yielding a skewed sample? Why are so many countries not taking part in PISA? There are students learning on dirt floors or without access to any education at all. All the while a bunch of people in suits are deciding to see which privileged country’s students are number one.

It’s your turn to share 3 things. Shoot for the stars because you can. It will not be marked.
Countdown in 10, 9 … 3, 2, 1.

If you have made it this far, thank you for your interest in this topic. You are now past 3 minutes. Why not read on? Here is a very worthwhile reading list.

Pipeline to prison – https://briarpatchmagazine.com/articles/view/pipeline-to-prison

School-to-prison-pipeline – https://www.aclu.org/infographic/school-prison-pipeline-infographic?redirect=racial-justice/infographic-school-prison-pipeline

Project Liberty: School to prison pipeline –

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXR51vZCfVY

How High-Stakes Testing Feeds the School-to-Prison Pipeline Infographic –  http://www.fairtest.org/pipeline-infographic

US should nix its federal department of education –  http://www.troymedia.com/2016/12/12/canada-proves-dont-need-federal-department-education/

School performance rankings from the Fraser Institute –  https://www.fraserinstitute.org/school-performance

How does a school district affect the value of your home (don’t miss comments) –

http://torontorealtyblog.com/archives/10020

The standardised test debate. Is EQAO good for education? (don’t miss comments) –

https://tapintoteenminds.com/the-standardized-test-debate-is-eqao-good-for-education/

School choice not the right choice for our kids –  http://www.freep.com/story/opinion/columnists/nancy-kaffer/2016/10/02/choice-schools-michigan/91240656/

Pisa and the creativity puzzle – http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/education/pisa-and-the-creativity-puzzle

The tower of PISA is badly leaning – https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2015/03/24/the-tower-of-pisa-is-badly-leaning-an-argument-for-why-it-should-be-saved/?utm_term=.c813afeddee2

My adventures with failure

When we consider our possessions and social status as the only measures of success in life then we have failed to see the big picture. In this post, my incredible niece, Hailey shares from the heart how she overcame a near death experience in her 20s to travel, experience, and photograph our world at a time in life where so many people are too busy chasing careers and things rather than discovering a world waiting for them to experi ence it.

Kean on Culture

I have put this blog off for more than a week. I have written and rewritten it 7 times. I have thought about it and gotten really confused and then emptied my brain and began to think about it again. How do you write about failure, about your own personal failure without embarrassing yourself or being a propagator of TMI? Bear with me. I’m going to write this the only way I can: honestly.

Now that I’m in my 30’s I feel this firm pressure to be at a certain point in my life socially and economically. This feeling becomes more prominent with every wedding invitation I collect, every baby that one of my friends’ pops out, every condo an ex buys and every job promotion one of my university classmates receives. I then realize that I don’t have any of these things and a shadow of failure starts to…

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Keep swinging for the fences — The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning

photo by jcclark74 CC0 Spring is definitely here, perhaps this is not so evident in our temperamental weather, but by the fact that baseball season is back. In honour of that I wanted to share some connections to how being a student of the game is like learning in the classroom. I look at baseball as a sport for all ages…

via Keep swinging for the fences — The Heart and Art of Teaching and Learning

Perception

How we perceive ourselves is a matter of inner vision, trust, and wisdom. It must come from the belief we are all infinitely awesome at something. For me this came in realizing, albeit later in life, my true calling as an encourager, mentor, and educator.

So, at a time when mid-life sees many people my age taking stock of their relationships and buying little red sports cars, I sold my company and took a gigantic leap of faith with family intact.

Deciding to pursue a career in education came with an unimaginable amount of uncertainty. Terrible job prospects, rejection letters from all but one faculty of education (props Tyndale), and reduced revenue streams while I studied, practice taught, parented, and husbanded (a considerable challenge indeed).

Do you know the expression sometimes you have to learn the hard way before you can learn the right way? I’m sure I made some of that up, but I had basically flunked out of university in the 80s. I left with a chip in my shoulder and hurt that I did not succeed. What happened next was not a 25 year pity party over, but rather an education along the road of experience.

This journey has allowed me to arrive, alive, bruised, and better. What I learnt was that although what I did wasn’t always a success, it was the best I could do at the time. That my best was good enough so self-doubt, my ego, and abject personal disdain could go shove a rock. I realized I was a work in progress.

So…What makes you get out of bed before the alarm clock each morning?
Are you in the place that makes you the happiest and your light is undeniable?
How do you stay there? What sustains you when times get tough?

What keeps you hitting the snooze button until last minute late panic sets in or a terrible song drives you screaming towards the bathroom?
What would it take for you to change and get up before your alarm?

Where do you turn when you need help?
What would you change if you knew you would not fail?
Who could you talk to today?

Is it a matter of how you perceive yourself? Let’s Talk.

Coding is contagious

Caution. Coding can be contagious. Once caught it can lead to critical thinking, problem solving skills, and perseverance. Other side effects may include confidence and resilience, but may also be complicated by varying degrees of happiness ranging from enthusiastic to ecstatic.

That was the case this past month at Beckett Farm PS where nearly 600 students, from K to 8, took part in the Hour of Code.

Hour of Code is a global initiative to get students interested in computer science. Since its start in 2013, it has grown into an annual event involving over 100 million students from 180 countries. People like Bill Gates, Barack Obama, and Malala Yousafzai have been at the forefront of famous names to encourage students, of all ages and backgrounds, to take an hour and learn to code.

This year’s event at BFPS (our 2nd) was greatly anticipated as it included Star Wars, and Frozen among the programming choices. My grade 6 class stepped-up as amazing in-school ambassadors sharing coding with our Kindergarten and Primary students. What was awesome to witness was how naturally each of our students shared their enthusiasm for coding across age and gender lines.

In fact, this year’s Hour of Code Among saw the largest number of girls to ever try computer science in history. Hour of Code provides a great way to shrink the diversity gap in computer science by fostering interest and giving access to students at the earliest ages. By doing so, we can cultivate their confidence and skills to code and create into the future.

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6 words

It takes time to express yourself.
It takes effort to be precise.
Ideas are always possible when shared.

I am a huge fan of the 6 word memoir. I penned my first one in teacher’s college, and it has served me well for years. It goes:

I am a work in progress.

Take a look at the sign I’m holding in the picture above. You’ll notice I’ve reworded my original 6 word narrative, but did you see anything off about the picture? Hey! Other than the guy holding the sign?

The sign was rewritten to be inclusive of all learners. I am no longer a singular work in progress, but one of many works in progress. My calling as an educator has enabled me to see things differently now.

This year, one of my 6 word posts from Twitter was published in The Best Advice in Six Words, in November. Fortunately, my copy arrived in time to give to my dad as a Christmas present. The book has hundreds of pages of advice culled from a global cohort of advice givers, some of them famous, and others, like me, who are not so well known.

As dad gifts go, this one brings me full circle. It was my dad who distributed the wisdom growing up (he still does). Mom also played a huge role there too; she was the enforcer (she still is). Since starting my career in education it has been my goal to keep their work going.

While I was growing up, when my dad spoke I paid attention. It wasn’t out of fear, but in anticipation and respect. Although, he was always a man of few words what he shared resonated and stuck.

In September 1983 he told me, “It is a character building year.” (6 words) He wasn’t wrong. By the end of that school year in 1984, the joke became I had too much character. A bit of laughter reckoned the experience of completing grades 12 and 13 –  while holding down a part time job, competing in sports, and working as student council spirit rep.

He also shared, “There aren’t any leaders without followers.” (6 words) Ouch! That one took me down a peg as an impetuous young man who knew everything and had figured out the rest. Dad was right. What we sow in the service of others, whether it was with kindness or encouragement mattered. Time after time since hearing those words they have anchored my worldview as an entrepreneur and educator.

6 word stories are also a part of my Literacy instruction. My students are tasked with writing 6 word character studies, 6 word essays, and 6 word reflections about their learning. The exercise allows us to throw language conventions out the window and get to the heart of ideas and understandings. Students are challenged at first to communicate their most important thoughts, uncluttered from superfluous details.

Maybe it is the simplicity of having only 6 words to work with that make it so effective in the classroom? Perhaps, my dad was like a 6 word chef way ahead of his time cooking and serving thoughts in:

Edible, tasty, digestible and memorable mindfuls.

Cheers to great progress in 2016.

 

Innovative Educator

I’m an educator.
Moreover, a thought provoker.

I’m nice.
Maybe too nice?
My students might disagree when I hold them accountable.
I believe that learners need to reach for an opportunity rather than have it handed to them.

I’m funny (ha-ha, not peculiar).
Maybe a little too funny for some people.
What can I say? I believe in using humour in the classroom?
Studies show how laughter relaxes the brain and increases retention in students.

I’m creative, current, and constantly learning.
A sound body is as equally important as a sound mind.
I believe that mental health and wellness are as important as the curriculum in the classroom.
I have become a quasi-psychologist, tech wizard, instructor, first-aid responder, mentor, and arbiter all in one.

Yet, despite all of the things I do in and out of the classroom, in the name of education, not a single one of these things makes me feel like an innovator in my career. So what does?

This year I was given the honour of being named 1 of 28 TED Ed Innovative Educators. Our global cohort has been learning & meeting on-line, creating & sharing TED Ed Lessons since July. On September 1st we were introduced and it felt great. In a way I feel like the Scarecrow from the Wizard of OZ who got his diploma. I know this because it seemed like the only thing that changed was the recognition of my practice. Perhaps recognition as an innovative educator helped me understand how I’m an innovator?

So what do I do to deserve this mind-bogglingly humbling privilege? Let me share:

If a student struggles to write a test because s/he’s hungry, and I provide a snack, support, and some extra time maybe this is what makes me an innovative educator?

Whenever a fellow teacher seeks my support with with a challenging student, and I can help, maybe it’s the ability to collaborate on a solution with that teacher that makes me an innovative educator?

When ideas can be sparked, fostered, and brought to fruition because I got out of the way of my students, is what makes me an innovative educator.

When new ideas, opportunities, and experiences arrive in my world, and I don’t run the other way screaming, but instead turn to embrace and make them my own makes me an innovative educator?

When a parent is worried that their child is not successful, I point out that our class is about progress not perfection, and that their child is progressing well, I am an innovative educator.

When I share my time, experience, and encouragement with others knowing that together none of us is as smart, or innovative, as all of us I am an innovative educator.

When I take current events and mesh them onto ancient curriculum requirements making lessons relevant to modern learners, I am an innovative educator. This includes infusing social-justice, activism, empathy, and life learning in every lesson possible too.

Maybe it simply boils down to this. I care more about students/teachers than myself. I am willing to collaborate/support them to do that which has never been done in order to achieve something incredible.

I will learn, un-learn, and re-learn whenever and wherever necessary.
I will challenge, provide next steps, and encourage students/teachers to get the best out of them.

I am an educator.
An innovative educator.

What are holes made of? Pt 1 Science

Once in a while this past school year, I had the privilege to work with kindergarten students. To no one’s surprise, despite their diminutive(more like Minions) stature, they too are incredibly big thinkers.

I like big thinking. It’s awesome just thinking about it.Sounds like borderline epistemology to me.Trying to confine or quantify big thinking requires patience, and the intangible ability to simultaneously navigate many paths without a map. In other words…it’s fun! As an added bonus, ideas from big thinking opportunities span the spectrum of thought and possibility.

To break the ice, I started asking students to share their favourite words. This led to some interesting, albeit occasionally unpredictable responses. I will leave it to your imagination what the words were, but they do rhyme with art, and gut. OK, so I opened a doorway through laughter and the students had a chance to share, knowing their answers were 100% correct. Photo credit to woodleywonderworks https://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/Photo credit to woodleywonderworks https://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/

Next time, I had some time with a group of kindergarteners, I decided it was Math time. “Share a number between 1 and 5 with a partner?” “What’s the biggest number you can get if you add them up?” “What’s the smallest number you can get with a partner?” “Could we add up all of our numbers to see how many we have as a group?” “How could we show our answers using materials from the class?”

Well if we’re going to do Math, then Science was not far behind…So into the abyss of our next lesson we dived.

“What are holes made out of?” For a moment I thought I was being controlled from a remote location by Sugata Mitra. This was his type of inquiry question. Mischievous grin included. A-Ha! A question that did not have an immediate answer. A question that asked students to think, and in the process discover, as spoken by Morpheus in the Matrix, “How deep the rabbit hole goes.” Down the Rabbit Hole by Valerie Hinojosaphoto credit: Down the Rabbit Hole by Valerie Hinojosa

After the I don’t knows, blank stares and huhs, came the answers… Air and nothing? Hmm I asked. “Of the two answers, which one do you think is the most correct, because I like them both?”  (more silence) “Air”. OK Air it is. What is air made from? I’ve lost them…for a moment. I know…more questions! “Does a hole have to be round?”

When we think of holes, our immediate responses are the same as the kindergarteners that day. And that’s ok, but when we have time to think about it we can all arrive at some pretty deep understandings about what many just think is nothing.

Holes are all around us. I get the irony of that last sentence, and am still willing to keep writing. Doughnuts, bagels, cheese and other foods have holes. We have holes in our heads. Some animals make their homes in holes. Humans too. Throughout history holes have been included in our architecture. Not that we should brag, but we have also managed to make a hole in our Ozone layer. Not cool humankind. Not cool.

photo via NASA

photo via NASA

When it comes to holes, it is probably the study of black holes which captivates the minds of a majority of scientists, physicists, philosophers, and Sci-Fi enthusiasts. Are the spaces in between just as important as the objects surrounding them? With questions like this flying around our minds, it becomes clear that there is a whole lot to know about holes.

This post is a departure of sorts. I am attempting to script a TED Ed lesson and felt this format would be a great way to flesh out a script and enlist support from peers. Please take time to comment, like and even share. I value your feedback and support. In the process of drafting this post, my son and wife provided several valuable points. And as such, this has now become 2 posts about holes. Will

Now the lesson…Even though the preamble is about holes, here’s an object lesson about air and states of matter.

Sharing that even the air around us is made up of certain types of matter. I share the 3 basic states of matter with the students from gas, liquids and solids. I left plasma out for this age, but was tempted to drop on them anyway. So I take out two identical large clear plastic bags and a metre stick, and ask the students to compare the bags. After a few moments they all agree the bags are the same and the metre stick is a fun substitute for an imaginary light sabre. I shouldn’t have shown them that last thing. I ask a few volunteers if they can help me teach about balance using the metre stick. We then practise with rulers to understand the idea a bit(lot) better.

Next, I fill one of the bags with air, tie it off and tape it onto one end of the metre stick. I ask students to describe what was in the bags? Afterwards, we taped the other bag on the opposite side of the metre stick immediately followed by students’ predictions about what was going to happen next? With 2 students helping, we lift up the metre stick with my finger carefully and precisely placed between the two bags taped onto it. They let go and for some reason one side begins to drop towards the floor. What is happening? What does this mean? Laughs, a few moments of silence to process and then some sharing.
I ask, “So you are telling me that the air around us weighs something?”  “That means it has mass,” I continue, “even though we can’t see what makes up air, it is still made of something.”

“What else has mass?”…

Maybe next time.

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Holes of Matter