You wore orange

You wore orange.
They tore your clothes,
the rips much deeper than the threads.

You wore orange.
They swore to save you from
what they could not understand.

You wore orange.
They found it too bright for
their darkened souls.

You wore orange.
They stole your shirt,
but not your sacred fire.

 

The ABCs, verbs, and a reminder to government about their actions

As soon as 2 mouths are open, listening
Becomes impossible. Be still and
Calm your urges to react.

Cultivate your responses with tact and care.
Be bold in the face of ongoing acrimony.
Accept that change takes time(or an election cycle).

At a point where everyone expects instant gratification, information, and action telling the world to wait, think, and then act requires a bold courage beyond any mandate from 40.5% of voters. Regardless of political stripes, promises, and budgets, decisions must be made to benefit the entire populace not provoke or punish it.

Yet, it seems punishment in the form of economic funding cuts is all that is taking place. The public outcry is deafening already, and growing louder everyday. No one thinks cutting education, health care, or social service funding is a good idea.

With so many public services under attack and more cuts coming our way I wanted to consider the impact of government actions in terms of verbs in an alpha-betical construct.

Aim – attention from your current actions and onto publicity stunts
Blame – the past government for everything
Claim – you are acting on behalf of the people
Denigrate – all citizens opposed to your actions(students, teachers, nurses, doctors, legal aid, trade unions, union leadership, public service, municipal governments, social services advocates, scientists, youth/outreach workers, poverty activiststs)

Explain – that times are tough, and that everyone must do their part…to widen the gap between rich and poor(must have left that part out)
Feign – indignance rather than stand back to see the financial and social impact that such short sighted decision making will have on society
Gain – an affluent base to keep happy or a motivated electorate intent on ending a mistaken mandate…short term gain for long term pain

Harangue – any and all opposition from the public and press that does not follow party platforms – see also hector
Inflame – situations by refusing to answer direct questions in the legislative chamber, but choosing instead to derrogate the opposition while touting “accomplishments”
Jab – at those who dare stand up against arbitrary cuts while watching the richest earners/companies not expected to pay their fair share(s)
Kick – programs that help the most vulnerable to the curb(safe injection sites, Legal Aid,
Launch – attacks at union leadership, teachers, and students for protesting cuts to education
Manipulate – the media by generating a provincially funded news source to stream unchallenged government narratives
Negate – all the good that exists in our province that will continue – educational success, job creation, maintenance of social safety net
Obfuscate – every noble platform priority in favour of fixing a fictitious fiscal fantasy
Profit – from backroom connections that line the pockets of cronies and friends of the family

Question – everything that does not willingly lineup, salute, and drink the  party Kool Aid
Refuse – to consider the long term impact of poor public policy on justice, access, education, health care, mental health, and the economy.
Scold – leaders fighting for the rights of workers instead of inviting them to collaborate on ideas together

Taunt – the media, trade unions, families, students, teachers, front line health care workers, the poor(a buck a beer is not a policy win)
Undermine – years of hard work in areas of Special Education, FDK, and ASD treatment access
Vex – bait, confuse, and switch messages, narratives, and directions in order to bluff out the players in the game. To cause dis-ease in the ranks all the while peeking at the cards they might be holding.

Wonder -why is everybody so upset? Everyone can find 4% savings if they look close enough.
Xerox – duplicate what is being done south of the boarder by populist politicians

Yawp – complain whiningly with great noise and blame about the policies of other past and present governments
and
Zigzag – never defining or refining specific policy or platform goal beyond a provocative headline or veiled promise.

I am sure that there are hundreds of other verbs that could comprise this list. Feel free to share some of your own verbs from A to Z in the comment section.

If you liked or felt challenged by what you’ve read,  please share. Thanks for reading.

Chesed – חסד

Last week, I met with a young man and his mother via Skype to help give a TED Ed style talk. It was the first of several virtual conversations we planned.

Once the technical bugs were worked out between 500+ km of fibre optics, I was greeted by a shy, yet mischievious smile and a kind woman. There was instant rapport. The pair willingly shared in the conversation. We chatted for an hour and throughout it all, I felt like I’d known them for years. It was like we were family and my Hebrew vocabulary increased too. 

We said our goodbyes and planned to speak again. I left the conversation feeling happy and inspired. What I did not realize at the time, was it was to be our only meeting,

He was less than a decade old, and had probably done more living, in those short years, than most would with 10 times that many.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of medical appointments, diagnoses, and procedures. Yet, never without hope, desire, and strength.

Hope that he will continue to get better.
Desire to be a blessing to the lives of others.
Strength and determination to keep fighting everyday.

Impact is measured in lives changed. His was great and it can be characterized with a single Hebrew word, chesed – the attribute of grace, benevolence, or compassion – all of which he had plenty to spare.

His brief life was a reminder to all that everyone has a purpose to fulfill. And even though the number of days to fulfill our purpose is not known, to borrow the words of his mother, we too can be kiddush hashem, like this young man, true blessings to others.

 

The right words

I have the right words to say, but the lump in my throat won’t allow them out. These puffs of air that attempt to pass over my vocal cords do so without a peep.

I have the right words to say, but they’ve all been shared before. As if they are reserved only for the times when madness takes its toll.

Hurt
Broken
Asking why
But not shocked
Witness to despair
Slowly coming to grips
A nation that has lost itself
Reliving senseless hatred again.

We have the right words to say, but thoughts and prayers are not enough. Words won’t heal the destruction done by a damaged mind sowing seeds of their madness with a gun.

We have the right words, but maybe it’s time to listen instead?

 

What are holes made of? Pt 2 Language

bullet-holes-1744860_640bykiwikong

This is a mind purging follow up to my 2015 blog What are holes made of? Pt 1 Science. In it, I share a story from a kindergarten class where I asked them the title question. This post continues the conversation about holes and their simple and complex nature.

When we are in debt, we are in the hole. When prisoners are put into solitary confinement they are going down into the hole. Alice in Chains and the Police sang about holes. There was even a band called Hole. Who could forget that The Beatles sang Fixing a Hole on Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band? (I almost did)

Holes are similar to hunger. There are lots of holes in the foods we eat. Have you ever looked at a pancake or meringue? The lighter and fluffier the better. This has me wondering whether holes get confused with bubbles from time to time? If we really think about it at a molecular level, there are spaces in between everything – therefore holes.

Sports are filled with analogies about holes. A baseball player or golfer who is struggling to hit the ball is said to have a “hole in their swing”. Baseball players have been asked, on more than one occasion, whether there is a hole in their gloves?

In football, the offence is always looking to punch a hole through the defensive line in the hopes of seeing a little daylight on a running play. If a team does this enough times then they could score multiple time. If that happens, then their opponent might not be able to climb out of the hole they’ve made. Ouch.

Speaking of ouch, losing a player to injury will leave a “hole in the team”. Many fans have holes in their hearts when their favourite teams lose a game. Some of them could become motivational speakers for as often as they extol the virtues of patience, devotion, and ‘there’s always next season”. Maybe these die-hard fans have books in their futures?

Not surprisingly, there are books about holes. And at least one movie has been made about holes. Although, I’m not quite sure of the title. So with all of these holes to see through, what’s it all about?

When any of use language it can go a number of ways. We can dig ourselves into a hole with our words, or we can dig ourselves out just as quickly. Holes happen in arguments. When this happens such logical fallacies in one’s words expose them down to the profoundest levels. It is often said that a poor argument has as many holes in it as Swiss cheese. Words, true or otherwise might pierce the mind, but nothing can prepare for what pierces the body.

Bullet holes are also symbolic of some deep shit. Their blatant and sole intent is to put a hole in someone. To spill the lifeblood out of a fellow human might be the cruellest hole of all. When we think of all we can do to repair the holes we’ve made, there is little we can do after the hate decides to pull the trigger and fill others full of holes.

What I wonder is how the holes that have been put into people’s hearts today by gun violence and hatred could ever heal? Could we turn our minds to making things whole instead?

the rocks

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[[File:Rioters Throw Rocks near Nabi Saleh.jpg|Rioters Throw Rocks near Nabi Saleh]] CC BY 2.0

We are rocks.
We are witnesses to all that has passed in front, under and over us, and all that will surely come.
We wait.

Our once jagged edges smoothed by time, wind, and water.
We have been used as hammers, as walls, and as weights.

We have become weapons; thrown back and forth between sides who no longer remember, or understand the original reasons why.

Too many times, we have been plucked from a peaceful place only to be thrown in anger. We land as far as rage and fear can fling.

We have broken windows and bones.
We have been used to punish and frighten.
Our pores hold on to the skin and blood of those whom we’ve struck.

There are nicks and pocks about our surfaces from millennia of contact and conflict.
Each time we are hurled, a piece of us gets left behind as we, too, become battered and bruised.

Praying, like all of the other rocks, to become piles of dust that rest in peace
– to be thrown no more.

 

Who knew that thinking we were not good at Math ≠ the Truth?

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photo by Sam Howzit CC BY 2.0

Well in advance of my ever becoming an educator came an episode of BBC’s Dr. Who, where the TARDIS traveller shared,

“You know the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common: They don’t alter their views to fit the facts; they alter the facts to fit their views, which can be uncomfortable if you happen to be one of the facts that needs altering.” from Dr Who Episode – The Face of Evil Part 4 January 22, 1977

It seems very clear now, that we are capable of convincing ourselves of anything regardless of sensibility, social standing, or support system. It’s happening everyday in classrooms because it has been allowed to happen over and over this way since forever. I’ll use the short story below to illustrate how it might be playing out in a typical Math classroom.

Some others

It’s a Tuesday, or is it Wednesday? No matter, because it’s Mathday. A teacher shares the concept(s). Some respond with nods, others avoid eye-contact, and silent supplications of “please don’t ask me to explain this”. Students try to understand what’s being taught. Some get it faster than others. Seconds pass, then minutes. Teacher grows impatient with awkward silences and then ploughs on. As if in unison, the others begin to doubt whether they’ll ever get it? Some wonder in disbelief how the others don’t get it and repeat. At some point most educators will have learners floating in various states between being some or the others.

Suddenly, but with far less warning, an assessment is given and the results serve to separate some from the others. Followed by a false, yet difficult to overcome, opinion that Math ‘can’t be got’, and therefore  must be hated, simply because of the inability of others to solve all or some of the concepts taught and problems given. This imbalanced view negatively warps some mindsets one way or an other;

  1. They tie Math and other academic success to self-worth
  2. Students begin to doubt their abilities based on single results rather than embracing an attitude of process and progress instead of performance.
  3. Problem solving skills are mitigated out of the day by educators who feel they have to cover what’s in the text books rather than what’s needed by their students. In other words they are being taught to the test rather than being allow to test what they’re taught.
  4. Resilience is skill that goes further underdeveloped in favour of focusing on report card marks. Instead of emphasising growth from concept attainment, iterative thinking, and real life application opportunities students are made to live, breathe, and be measured by a singular method and measure.

Simply put, we can’t allow alternative facts, false beliefs, or misinformation to infect the minds of our learners and colleagues. Yes, teachers believe that they can’t do Math too. We need to stand in the gap to prevent and dispel destructive mindsets. For some students and teachers this means time to unlearn, a safe place to make mistakes, relearn, and start again.

If we equip our learners with the ability to re-frame their focus with confidence and arm them with problem solving tools we can erase the discourse of doubt that plagues so many. This will run counter to the mass instruction of the past, but it will be better than perpetuating the destruction any longer. We need to understand that we are works in process and success will look different from lesson to lesson and learner to learner.

Perhaps then, the breezy breath of fresh air will be felt as a change for the better by everyone? In the meantime, I will be moving the air about my classroom like a human tornado helping students understand that thinking they are not good at Math is does not equal the truth.

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